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Monthly CURE Newsletter

We have a monthly newsletter that is distributed throughout the first-year residence halls and the College of Visual and Performing Art. The purpose of the newsletter is to give students a platform to practice writing for an audience—an opportunity that should be more available in undergraduate education. The newsletter is designed by Graphic Design student Rachael Abrantes. Download PDFs of past issues below:

Volume 1, Issue 1
Volume 1, Issue 2

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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Weaving Community in collaboration with the Leduc Center for Civic Engagement

In collaboration with the Leduc Center for Civic Engagement, we've been collecting recycled t-shirts to raise awareness about textile waste, and inspired by Fritz Haeg and his project Domestic Integrities, we've been hosting public workshops around campus where folks can add to two large hand-crocheted rugs made from the donated t-shirts. As part of the first workshop, we invited Jamie Jacquart, the UMass D recycling coordinator, and Marissa Perez Dormitzer, a local recycling coordinator, for a public conversation about recycling on campus and beyond.

In the following months, we plan to continue growing the rugs and using them as sites for dialogues about recycling and waste management. Please be in touch of your organization or department wants to host a workshop.

This project relates to our research topic: sustainability.

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Ant Farm/Art Fam Gallery in Chestnut Residence Hall

After we found out about two empty rooms in the residence halls that had formerly been in use as a gallery, we decided to clean them up and make a new student-run gallery!

All the exhibitions are organized by students, and so far, we've shown work by UMass Dartmouth students. In addition to the installation of artwork, we've hosted workshops and artist talks related to the exhibitions.

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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A Few of our Social Justice Heroes

Earlier this school year, I visited the Frederick Douglass Unity House at UMass Dartmouth where I’m currently a visiting artist, and I saw a portrait of Malcolm X taped to the door. I found out that first-year student Mark Kayanja made the drawing, and I asked him about it. He told me that the portrait was a way to honor Malcolm X who he sees as an inspirational figure in his life.

After that conversation, I thought it would be fun to learn more about who other students are inspired by, so we decided to put out a call for “social justice hero portraits.” I made prints of the portraits submitted by students and other people affiliated with the Center for Undisciplined Research, and here is the first set.

I see this group of portraits as a tool for education, a site where we can go to learn about who our friends and colleagues are inspired by - the portraits make me curious about who these heroes are and what their relationship to social justice is, and I’ve already learned a lot about the people portrayed here. I encourage you to do the same.

My dream is for this installation to grow and travel to different places around the area. If you’d like to submit a portrait for the installation, please email a digital file to me at hi@undisciplinedresearch.info. Download a PDF of the pamphlet here.

This project relates to our research topic: social justice.

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A Collection of Emotional Experiences in Downtown New Bedford

Jamie Uretsky, the curator at the New Bedford Art Museum invited us to make an installation inspired by the Situationist International movement and Guy Debord for the "Education and Engagement Wall" as part of the SCAPES: Placemaking in the 21st Century exhibition. There are definitions related to the Situationists written on the wall in addition to a large map of downtown New Bedford. Visitors of the museum can write a description of an emotional experience they had in the area, and we will illustrate their experience on the map. We also created a set of scores for developing a more emotional relationship with the city, you can download the PDF of prompts here. Additionally, there will be two public dérives in the spring:

Dérive led by dogs and their owners, accompanied by dog whisperers
February 24, 2018

Dérive led by musicians, accompanied by musical instruments
March 8, 2018

Text about "the dérive" from Maria Flores:

A basic concept or practice called derive, a technique of rapid passage through spaces.

The derive involves playful and constructive behaviors and an awareness of psychogeographical effects. They take on a very different approach from just strolling or taking a journey. In a derive the individual, or several individuals, drop their every day tasks and activities and go on with movement and action. They let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and what they find there. They do not have a motif in mind, they are just experiencing the city open to new perceptions.

A derive should not be merely one or two hours, the individual should not be aware of the time. The intention is to have a mental map of duration and your surroundings.

So how exactly does one "derive"? Well as a new learner and practitioner of the concept, going to the place without an ultimate motive, clearing your mind of subjections and judgments to your surroundings is a very hard thing to do. Although you have been to this area of the city thousands of times before, it must never reflect on your past experiences. You have to let the surroundings absorb you.

https://thearchiologist.com/article/2016/10/02/theory-of-the-derive

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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Ideas for Magic Moments in the City

As part of the "Education and Engagement Wall" installation we made for the New Bedford Art Museum's SCAPES: Placemaking in the 21st Century exhibition, Roz wrote twelve personalized scores for finding magic moments in the city. Anyone who attended the exhibition open-house event during November's AHA Night at the museum was invited to participate.

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

For the Love of Art! This is a collaborative online exhibition made by students from Catherine Moran's Honors ARH 102 class. Each student selected one artwork they learned about in class and one artwork they wish they had learned about in the class for the exhibition. We had an opening reception where each student got to say a few words about why the selected the works they chose. See the exhibition here. This project relates to our research topic: local culture.

For the Love of Art!

This is a collaborative online exhibition made by students from Catherine Moran's Honors ARH 102 class. Each student selected one artwork they learned about in class and one artwork they wish they had learned about in the class for the exhibition. We had an opening reception where each student got to say a few words about why the selected the works they chose. See the exhibition here.

This project relates to our research topic: local culture.

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100 Values

As part of the Teaching Social Practice Conference organized by Ellen Mueller, Roz led an exercise for about 75 educators from around the country where everyone was invited to write down their top 100 values in seven minutes. With permission from the educators, Roz installed their responses on our cork board in CVPA so students from the college could see how much or how little they had in common with art educators.

This project relates to our research topic: local culture.

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This Isn't Good Enough: A Workshop

Rosalind Franklin University (the second) was created by the following folks as part of a workshop called, “This isn’t good enough,” during which we explored the concept of “microutopia” and socially engaged art. The workshop took place in an honors class at UMass Dartmouth called Scholarship in the Community in November 2017. The experience was facilitated by Roz Crews as part of the Center for Undisciplined Research in Thomas Stubblefield’s class. Download the PDF about our university here.

Alana McGraw
Alden
Amanda Read
Anna O’Keefe
Arielle
Britni Robson
Hattie
Nicholas
Pearl McCarthy
Sylvia
Tara Clark
Victoria

and others.


This project relates to our research topic: social justice.

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Discussion about Politics in the Classroom

As part of the Teaching Social Practice Conference organized by Ellen Mueller, we hosted a conversation and workshop about the importance and potential discomfort of talking politics in the classroom. Attendees included art educators from around the country. There is a forthcoming publication outlining the results of our efforts during and after the workshop.

This project relates to our research topic: social justice.

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Explorations at the Buttonwood Park Zoo

As a group, we've been visiting the Buttonwood Park Zoo to observe animals and talk about the purpose of zoos.

This project relates to our research topic: sustainability.

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A Very Brief Tour of Public Art at UMass Dartmouth

A precursor to our first book, this tour was designed for Dr. Rebecca Uchill's class ARH 390: Processing Place. Roz created an edition of 25 maps for the students who came on the tour.

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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Class Visits and Discussions about Socially-Engaged Art

Roz regularly visits classes across campus to talk about socially-engaged art and the various approaches artists take towards making work outside of the studio.

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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Theropod Footprint Fossil State Park in Massachusetts

As part of the annual Trunk N' Treat event at the New Bedford YMCA, we turned Roz's car into a fake state park to educate folks about Massachusetts' state fossil, theropod fossils!

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.

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Wouldn't exist without your questions

This performance happened at the Star Store in downtown New Bedford on September 14th during AHA! Night (about a week and a half after classes began). I, Roz, invited participants to ask me anything, and I responded to their question with a drawing that they could take home. I also collected all the questions I was asked, by the end of 2.5 hours of non-stop drawing, I made 57 drawings. The experience was designed as a way for me to get to know students and faculty at CVPA by making myself vulnerable to their questions, and in return, they got an honest drawing which in some ways contains a little piece of me and a window into my mind. The AHA! Night crew came by to interview me about CURE for the local cable access channel.

This project relates to our research topic: local cultures.  

Students watching as I answer the question, "What makes you happy?" with a drawing.

Students watching as I answer the question, "What makes you happy?" with a drawing.

A drawing for Megan answer the question, "What is your strategy for staying positive?"

A drawing for Megan answer the question, "What is your strategy for staying positive?"